sallysnowglobe:

Did you know that whale sharks can grow to up to 20 metres long and are believed to live up to 100 years old?
The largest whale shark (caught off of Taiwan) was measured at 20 meters in length, while the smallest (found free-swimming in Donsol, Philippines) measured only 46 cm long. However, sizes at birth can vary. A whale shark caught by fishermen in India still had a yolk sack attached and measured 94 cm, while researchers recorded a shark measuring only 61 cm without a yolk sac inside a pregnant whale shark in Taiwan.

Marissa Fox and the Large Marine Vertebrates Project need your help to find and protect critical whale shark habitats. Share the video in the link below and ask your friends to do the same. Your vote will make a difference!
http://expeditiongranted.nationalgeographic.com/project/above-giants/

sallysnowglobe:

Did you know that whale sharks can grow to up to 20 metres long and are believed to live up to 100 years old?

The largest whale shark (caught off of Taiwan) was measured at 20 meters in length, while the smallest (found free-swimming in Donsol, Philippines) measured only 46 cm long. However, sizes at birth can vary. A whale shark caught by fishermen in India still had a yolk sack attached and measured 94 cm, while researchers recorded a shark measuring only 61 cm without a yolk sac inside a pregnant whale shark in Taiwan.

Marissa Fox and the Large Marine Vertebrates Project need your help to find and protect critical whale shark habitats. Share the video in the link below and ask your friends to do the same. Your vote will make a difference!

http://expeditiongranted.nationalgeographic.com/project/above-giants/

Reblogged from hoe-hovahne

scottish-orca:

This blog has always been surprised a the messages we receive indicating they had no idea Orcas were apart of UK wildlife and has always tried to get the word out there that they are out there! 

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(Shetland 17th July 2011 X )

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(Shetland 27th July 2013 - Mousa (019) X

Don’t fancy that far north?…

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(Gairloch 22nd July 2013 - Moneypenny and John Coe X )

Now I can’t stand here and say they are a guaranteed sighting they’re a wild animal! One of this blog’s runners lives in the outer hebrides and has never caught a glimpse of these guys- but aren’t they worth the chance? 

To see these guys is a discovery, places like the Hebrides whale and dolphin trust rely on public sightings to create a network of where these guys travel, as do the seawatch foundation  to get the best network of sightings they need whale watchers… they need you.

Reblogged from hoe-hovahne